New Perspectives on Romance Linguistics, Vol. I: Morphology, by Chiyo Nishida (ed.), Jean-Pierre Y. Montreuil (ed.)

By Chiyo Nishida (ed.), Jean-Pierre Y. Montreuil (ed.)

This can be the 1st of 2 volumes emanating from the Linguistic Symposium on Romance Languages held on the collage of Texas at Austin in February 2005. It positive aspects the keynote tackle added through Denis Bouchard on exaptation and linguistic clarification, in addition to seventeen contributions by way of rising and the world over well-known students of Spanish, French, Italian, in addition to Rumanian. whereas the emphasis bears on formal analyses, the assurance is remarkably large, as issues variety from morphology, syntax, semantics, pragmatics and language acquisition. every one article seeks to symbolize a brand new standpoint on those subject matters and various frameworks and ideas are exploited: distributive morphology, entailment thought, grammaticalization, details constitution, left-periphery, polarity lattice, spatial individuation, thematic hierarchy, and so on. This quantity will problem an individual attracted to present concerns in theoretical Romance Linguistics.

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As for FLN, all it contains is the association which forms signs, the linking between a signifié and a signifiant. 3. Deriving other novel traits My hypothesis has another important advantage over the proposal in HCF. In addition to recursion in the linking between SM and CI, they point out several other novel traits, constraints in animals which humans had to overcome at some point in order to acquire natural languages. In their model, these traits appear to be unconnected, to have independently emerged from an ancestral node and have converged into human communication.

The main reason for this is that there are clear restrictions on the type of the vPs that can be nominalized. For instance, the complement cannot be a clause. Thus, alongside French compte-tours “revolution counter”, a form such as the one in (29) does not occur. (29) *un [compte combien de tours le moteur fait ] a count how+many of revolutions the motor makes Similarly, the complement cannot be a referential DP, as in (30). (30) *un [compte ces tours ] a count these revolutions 24 REINEKE BOK-BENNEMA & BRIGITTE KAMPERS-MANHE In general terms, the functional categories that make up referential expressions or account for the anchoring of propositions are absent in the compounds under consideration.

We can see this effect when we try to learn sound bits from lexical items of a language we don’t know: without the leverage from the meaning associated with the sound bits, we are quite poor at it, and quickly limited. This trait—a large lexicon— therefore follows from my hypothesis. But it does not follow from HCF’s hypothesis that recursion is the basic distinctive property of human language. They suggest that this novel trait is an independently evolved mechanism, and they tie it to the human capacity for vocal imitation: Imitation is obviously a necessary component of the human capacity to acquire a shared and arbitrary lexicon, which is itself central BEYOND DESCRIPTIVISM 37 to the language capacity.

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